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How to take a good selfie


Today I came across one of those ‘I wish I’d thought of it for my wedding’ moments. Believe me, your Wedding Day may last for 12 hours but it’ll seem like two. In the days and weeks afterwards, I poured over not just the official photos, but fam and friends’ social media ones too. Seeing as we’re slap bang in the age of the selfie, I can happily say that there were lots to sift through. I loved seeing new friendships formed, (big tick for my table plan) that the speeches – and the champagne – were going down well and that my playlist looked to be a hit.

Like a lot of brides before me, I’d gone down the disposable camera route but what came back weren’t worth adding to my album stash. Red wine-stained tablecloths, tops of heads… you can imagine. I wished I’d hired some Table Selfies…..!

Huh? They’re genius. Think a camera on a turntable that you hide amongst your centrepiece (see below.) Guests swivel the camera in their direction, tap the screen to kickstart a countdown and pose away. They can then preview their photo and either print it at a set-up station or upload straight to social media. Best of all, the bride gets a complete set of everyone’s pictures on a USB stick.

I really wish I’d known about Table Selfies before my own Big Day. I’d have more pictures of my guests during the wedding breakfast and the speeches, you know, before the fizz had gone to their heads, the disco ball was spinning and the selfies got really blurred…..

Let’s face it, these days camera phones can be as prominent a wedding accessory as a … groom!  Not such a bad thing in my little white book either. After all, your wedding photos will forever hold the power to propel you back to the biggest and happiest day of your life. That’s why a Table Selfie would have got a big ‘I Do’ from me.


But talking of selfies, snapping a good one isn’t actually always as easy as ‘Say Cheese!’ I thought I’d ask wedding photographer Oana Brasoveanu of to offer her tips on giving good selfie.

1 Include a bit of background
Wedding decor can be so pretty so show some of it. Things like fairy lights, bunting and showers of confetti. Just avoid lots of heads in the background which could look too busy.
2. Lighting
If the reception is outside in the sunshine, some shadow will stop under-eye shadows or squinting. None around? Angle yourself to look up to the camera or better yet, wait for sunset as the light will be really flattering. If you’re inside, face a window for a nice bounce of natural light.
3. Composition
The best selfies happen when you’re not dead centre but off to one side. It’s called the “rule of thirds” – aim to get your eye line a third of the way down from the top of the frame. It’ll look less like a passport picture plus you get to show off your surroundings.
4. Colour swaps
Once you’ve snapped, play around with filters until you find one you love. Lower the light to a level which makes your skin look its most radiant. If there are lots of distracting colours in the background, try flipping it to black and white.
5. Body language
Avoid the following: your face too close to the camera, armpits, hands in the foreground which will look enormous and working a pose which makes your body look distorted – ie. big head on a small body.
6. Face off
There are lots of other gorgeous things to snap at a wedding. Okay, so not strictly selfies perhaps, but don’t pass up the opportunity to get some close-ups of details like sparkly shoes, beautiful bouquets, shiny new wedding rings etc…
7. Look your best
The closer you are to the camera, the bigger your nose will look. Don’t do the dreaded duck face (the cheeks in/lips out look) either and be aware than eating or drinking in a photo will never look good. Also, if you’re concerned about a double chin or sleepy-looking eyelids, look up into the lens. Smile with your eyes, adjust your shoulders so that one is slightly turned away and try a subtle hair toss for a natural lift.
8. Be natural
It can be tough to act natural when you’re looking at yourself on a camera screen. Try not to stare and just steady your gaze instead. If you’re taking a group selfie, engage in a fun activity or crack a joke so you can capture natural laughs. This is not your moment to become a Director – spontaneous photos are way more fun.



So how selfie-aware are you? Any other tips to pass on?

Sarah x

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  • I love a good selfie. I didn’t know about the official rule of thirds but I have taken enough to know that they look more flattering if I put my chin out and look up to the lens. Oh and I always make sure my makeup is good – no nasty shine, good glossy lips and non- separated fringe. I like the idea of the table selfie – I think k it’d make a great addition to my dressing table!!!!! Can you buy them rather than hire???? Amie x

    4 weeks ago : Amie
  • My rule for group selfies – don’t be the big friend at the front. Always put yourself in the middle. And take loads – there’s bound to be someone blinking!! Jodie x

    4 weeks ago : Jodie
  • I love watching people take selfies and can definitely say that the average wedding will clock up thousands. I went to six weddings last summer and saw more Duck Faces than I could count. I can’t imagine that people look at the pictures and love them. I like selfies don’t get me wrong but I prefer natural, off the cuff ones. Your advice about cracking a joke or taking the picture whilst something is happening, say de-corking the champagne is a good one. And always take loads in case of photobombs and bunny ears. why do people think they’re the first person in the world to think of putting two fingers behind someone’s head. It’s just not funny – plus kinda hard to crop out. Emily xx

    3 weeks ago : emily
  • Wow. What a great idea. The official photographer at my sisters wedding two years ago was terrible. She has three good pictures maximum which are dotted all over the house! She paid a lot of money and has barely any memories of her big day. She’s pulled together selfies from guests just to get a gist of what went on/who wore what/who spoke to who etc… Having a camera on the table really appeals to me – you’re guaranteed lots of pictures of happy guests before the free bar really gets hold of them. I think I’d want it more hidden within my centre piece though. It’s definitely food for thought and in my ideas folder. Great post. Thanks. Tx

    3 weeks ago : thea
  • If I go to another wedding where there’s a photo booth I’ll scream. At last someone has come up with something modern – that doesn’t involve a long queue! x

    3 weeks ago : Aisha
  • Yep, I’m a selfie queen. I know that on my wedding day I’ll be selfie-ing like crazy with every one of my guests. Cheers for the tips. Tara xx

    2 weeks ago : tara
  • i would like to ban all phones/cameras from my wedding. I want total control over every snap of me that’s taken. but i know its not going to happen. I have to embrace the selfie. i just hate ‘selfie’ faces – smiles that aren’t natural, with a hint of pout and a lot of shoulder thrown in for good measure. why can’t people just have a laugh? i don’t want my wedding day to look staged.

    6 days ago : bella